What to drink with roast pork

Riesling and roast pork is a match made in heaven, but the drinking options don't end there, says Jane Faulkner.

UP TO $25

MOUNT MAJURA VINEYARD PINOT GRIS 2011 $25

PINOT gris with texture but not heaviness on the palate goes brilliantly with crackling, sweet roast pork and sauerkraut. It's just one reason why this pinot gris from Mount Majura, in the Canberra District, is such a terrific wine. It's varietally spot on with its pear and ginger-spice nuances, stone fruit, some nuttiness and almost a creamy texture mid-palate, yet lovely, fine acidity on the finish. A terrific example of pinot gris.

 

UP TO $40

QUEALY MUSK CREEK PINOT NOIR 2009 $40

THERE'S much to like in this juicy, tangy and tannic pinot noir. It's fragrant with Asian spice, earthy and deep with sour and ripe black cherries, rhubarb and cleansing acidity. Medium-bodied with some grip on the finish, it will continue to mellow during the next five years. Give this plenty of air to open up and if your pork is flavoured with five spice, garlic, loads of ginger and soy/hoisin sauces, this Mornington Peninsula pinot noir will be a delicious match. From Rathdowne Cellars, Carlton.

MORE THAN $40

FRANKLAND ESTATE SMITHCULLAM RIESLING 2011 $45

DRY riesling goes well with roast pork, but those with residual sugar - as in a German kabinett-style - are better. Trust me. Frankland Estate's flagship riesling - SmithCullam - is a case in point. On its own, a really beautiful drink, a perfect balance of sweetness and acidity that turns it into a more complex and textural wine. It's quite savoury, although there are citrus notes, a chalky, wet-pebble complexity, then a long finish. Extraordinary, with at least another decade ahead of it. Drink with rolled pork loin stuffed with prunes.

 

SPLURGE

EGON MULLER SCHARZHOFBERGER KABINETT 2010 $70

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EGON Muller is one of Germany's finest producers with a beautiful patch of land - the Scharzhofberger vineyard, one of the most famous in the Mosel. While some styles are expensive, the kabinett is good value. Beautifully balanced with its sweetness tempered by precise natural acidity, textural with stone fruit and spice and that distinct Mosel slate-pebble and utterly beguiling character. It complements thinly sliced pork and buttery cabbage flecked with caraway seeds. Try Prince Wine Store, South Melbourne.

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